Sky Lakes Pediatric Therapy

Pediatric Occupational Therapy

Sky Lakes Pediatric Therapy
2688 Campus Drive.
Klamath Falls, OR 97601
Office Phone Number
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Occupational therapists (OTs) collaborate with children and their families to promote success in self-care, and support engagement in desired activities. Our OTs work to involve our patients and family in their own care, and to find recommendations that fit into daily routines to improve overall self-competence, independence, and quality of daily life. The overall goal is to promote engagement in the things your child wants and needs to do, from basic activities of daily living, like getting dressed, meeting demands at school, as well as desired recreational and leisure activities like reading, drawing, sports, and play.

We provide assessment and treatment for the following:

Kendra Sereno

physical therapist

 

Facility

Phone Number

 

Activities of daily living (ADLs)

 

Activities of daily living (ADLs) are comprised of activities we do every day to take care of ourselves. These activities typically include dressing, bathing, using the bathroom, grooming & hygiene, eating, and sleep.

What can contribute to difficulties with ADLs:

 

  • Acute injury (such as surgeries, trauma, accidents/falls).
  • Neuromuscular conditions (such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, concussion, spina bifida etc.).
  • Conditions impacting the sensory system (such as neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, sensory processing deficits, etc.).
  • Developmental conditions (such as ASD, Down Syndrome, CMV infection, FAS disorder, etc.).
  • Any condition creating strain, stress, or difficulties with completing self-care.

How occupational therapy can help:

 

Occupational therapists make use of a comprehensive assessment of the goals of our clients, supports in the environment, and the demands of the activity. Treatment may include skill segmentation and training, strengthening and conditioning, practice with specific adaptive equipment, or modifying an activity to ensure greatest success in completing ADLs. If there is an activity you would like to improve upon or become more independent in, ask your OT how s/he can help.

Fine motor deficits/delay & Arm injury

 

Fine motor skills typically involve smaller movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists, in cooperation with the visual system. Pain or decrease in function of the hand or other part of the upper extremity can impact a child’s ability to complete ADLs, disrupt sleep, lower engagement in leisure activities, or impede performance at school. Deficits in this area may look like: difficulties with writing or typing, tying shoes/knots, managing buttons/zippers, or handling small objects such as fasteners, coins, or jewelry.

What can contribute to pain or decreased function of the upper extremity:

 

  • Fractures, strains, and sprains of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand.
  • Neuromuscular conditions (such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, concussion, spina bifida etc.).
  • Conditions impacting the sensory system (such as neuropathy, sensory processing deficits, etc.).
  • Developmental conditions (such as ASD, Down Syndrome, CMV infection, FAS disorder, etc.).
  • Brachial plexus birth palsy.
  • Injuries, surgeries, and/or diseases impacting the arm’s function or making it difficult to use in daily tasks.

How occupational therapy can help

 

The OT will work with your child and you to create a home program to support gaining arm/hand motion, strength, and coordination to support maximal function. Treatment may include assessment for adaptive equipment, splint/brace, stretching and strengthening, modalities, pain reduction strategies, activity modifications, and training in one-handed techniques if needed.

Developmental delay

 

Developmental delay refers to a delay in expected skills based on a child’s age, they may be ameliorated with intervention but can be present throughout the a person’s lifespan. There may be impact to a child’s physical abilities, learning, or behaviors, and may also affect daily routines, play, school performance, and home activities.

Developmental conditions can include:

 

  • Cerebral palsy.
  • Spina bifida.
  • Spinal muscular atrophy.
  • Intellectual disability.
  • Autism spectrum disorder.
  • Down Syndrome.
  • Sensory processing difficulties.
  • Or any condition impacting achievement of age-appropriate developmental milestones.

How occupational therapy can help:

 

Your OT completes an extensive interview and assessment with your child and you to find what supports she/he is able to offer to your child. Intervention can include skill building through strengthening and graded practice, compensation through equipment use or environmental modification, or caregiver training to promote your child’s maximal safety and success in all activities of play, self-care, and stages of life.

Sensory processing

 

Sensory processing is the process of taking in information through our senses, such as vision, hearing, touch, etc. and interpreting this information to allow for appropriate interaction within an environment. Dysfunction may occur in processing sensory information and result in a child struggling to participate in age-appropriate environments and activities.

What might sensory processing difficulties present as:

 

  • Temper tantrums with grooming activities (example trimming nails, brushing teeth, haircuts, etc.).
  • Pickiness with food.
  • High sensitivity to noise or lights.
  • Particular with clothing textures or fit.
  • Frequently lifts, pushes, or pulls furniture or other heavy objects.
  • Chews on non-food things, such as collar of a shirt, pens, toys, etc. (outside of teething stage).
  • Becomes very upset with changes in routine or set up of things around the home.
  • Spends a lot of time jumping off things, spinning in circles, or hanging upside down.

How occupational therapy can help:

 

Our OT will complete a thorough interview and assessment of your child based on observation and your reports of your child’s behaviors. The OT will work with your child to safely and appropriately introduce different sensory strategies to help your child self-regulate. The ultimate goal is to create a sensory program you are able to continue to use with your child outside of therapy sessions.

Assistive technology and durable medical equipment use

 

Assistive technology (AT) can refer to products, equipment, and systems that can enhance daily living, work, or other desired activities. It often includes equipment, programs, or products, such as modified lighting, talk-to-text support, or modified keyboards for computer use.

Durable medical equipment (DME) includes equipment and supplies that help complete daily activities. It is typically equipment only to be used by the intended person, for an extended amount of time. It includes items such as walkers, wheelchairs, bathroom seating, prosthetic devices, or orthotics.

What may contribute to use of AT or DME:

 

  • Acute injury (such as surgeries, trauma, accidents/falls).
  • Neuromuscular conditions (such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, concussion, spina bifida etc.).
  • Conditions impacting the sensory system (such as neuropathy, sensory processing deficits, etc.).
  • Developmental conditions (such as ASD, Down Syndrome, CMV infection, FAS disorder, etc.).
  • Any condition creating strain, stress, or difficulties with completing self-care, home care or community activities.

How occupational therapy can help

 

Your occupational therapist works with your child to determine areas where s/he may benefit from AT or DME. They are able to provide additional insight and recommendations on how AT or DME can fit your child’s specific needs and home set up. Treatment may include trial, setup, or training in the use of specific AT or DME.

Dysgraphia

 

Dysgraphia, often seen as poor handwriting, is used to describe difficulties with writing and/or typing due to coordination deficits. Dysgraphia may present as slow writing pace, poor handwriting quality, or observable clumsiness with attempting to form letters when writing.

What can contribute to dysgraphia:

 

  • Developmental delay
  • Dyslexia
  • Cerebral palsy
  • BPBP
  • Fine motor coordination difficulties
  • Visual-motor integration deficits
  • Injury to the arm/hand
  • Any condition, injury/disease impacting one’s ability to write.

How can occupational therapy help:

 

Your occupational therapist begins with a comprehensive examination of your handwriting, as well as visual-motor integration skills to determine the most appropriate area for initial intervention. Treatment typically includes strengthening exercises of the muscles of the hand, wrist, and forearm, as well as looking at overall stability of posture. Your OT will also complete assessment for modified pencil grips, grasp modifications, paper or keyboard/mouse modifications, and other writing supports.

Keywords: dysgraphia, poor handwriting, pencil grip, handwriting without tears